Resistant Hypertension Diagnosis May Mask Actual Condition

Research shows that many patients diagnosed with resistant hypertension may actually have white coat hypertension.

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If you have been diagnosed with resistant hypertension you instead might be suffering from "white-coat hypertension." A study published online March 28 in Hypertension examined 8,295 patients who were identified with resistant hypertension, which occurs when blood pressure remains high-above 140/90 mm HG-despite taking at least three different antihypertensive medications. The University of Barcelona researchers who led the study discovered that 37.5 percent of this group actually suffered from white coat hypertension, a condition where stress and/or anxiety related to doctor office visits temporarily raises blood pressure to high levels.
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