Blood Pressure

Cleveland Clinic Study Proposes New Way of Measuring Mortality Trends

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S., but that doesnt tell the full story of its burden on society and families, suggests a Cleveland Clinic researcher. Glen Taksler, PhD, lead author of a recent study in the American Journal of Public Health, says that by measuring the costs of heart disease, cancer and the other top causes of death in terms of life-years lost, we get a different picture of how serious these illnesses impact society. Life-years lost focuses on the number of years lost compared to a persons life expectancy.
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Heart Beat: November 2017

Going even just a few nights without treating your obstructive sleep apnea puts you at risk for higher levels of blood glucose (sugar) and higher blood pressure. This common sleep disorder can also contribute to higher levels of stress hormones in your system.
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Is Blood-Pressure Control Safer With Small Doses of More Meds?

When blood pressure control requires medications, you and your doctor have many options. There are dozens of types of antihypertensive drugs, and within each class of drug there are dozens more brand and generic options.
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Aggressive Blood Pressure Lowering Has Its Risks

Current blood pressure management guidelines recommend maintaining a blood pressure of less than 120/80 mm Hg. Guidelines further state that treatment is appropriate for most people if their blood pressure reaches 140/90 mm Hg or higher.
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Understand When Low Blood Pressure Is a Cause for Concern

If your blood pressure is still as low as it was when you were much younger, you might be inclined to take pride in avoiding a condition that threatens the health of millions of Americans: high blood pressure (hypertension).
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Study: Obesity Top Cause of Preventable Life-Years Lost

Of the many modifiable risk factors that contribute to chronic disease and death, obesity is far and away the biggest cause of preventable life-years lost, according to a study by Cleveland Clinic and New York University. In the study, researchers found that obesity resulted in 47 percent more lost life-years than cigarette smoking.
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Study: Angiotensin II May Help Patients with Low Blood Pressure

Angiotensin is a hormone that, when converted to angiotensin II, causes your blood vessels to contrict. This forces blood pressure to rise. Several types of blood pressure-lowering drugs are designed to block the formation of angiotensin II or interfere with its ability to narrow your arteries.
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How Cardiac Rehabilitation Fits in With Pulmonary Rehab

Its not uncommon for someone needing cardiac rehabilitation to simultaneously face other health problems, such as diabetes, arthritis, or Parkinsons disease. But an especially common dual challenge is dealing with heart disease and a lung condition, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that requires pulmonary rehabilitation. This presents a unique challenge to the patient and to the rehab specialists designing programs that help improve heart health and make breathing a little easier.
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Ask the Doctors: July 2017

I have elevated cholesterol, and for many years when I had blood work I was told to fast for 12 hours. Recently my primary care physician said that a non-fasting measurement would be as accurate. I have diabetes, and episodes of low blood sugar and fasting can sometimes cause a symptomatic drop in my blood sugar. What do you think? Ive read online that there is little evidence to support the use of statins in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and that the risks outweigh the benefits. I have no previous cardiovascular disease. How do I know if I should take statins?
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Download the Full June 2017 Issue PDF

Stroke is among the leading causes of death in the U.S., but it is still a misunderstood health condition. Plenty of myths and misguided ideas surround stroke, from its causes and symptoms to its potential severity and the particulars of recovery. To help clear up some misunderstandings, Efrain Salgado, MD, director of the Cleveland Clinic Florida Stroke Center and Neurosonology Laboratory, explains the truth about 10 common stroke myths
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Ask the Doctors: June 2017

Radiofrequency ablation is a useful tool for the management of individuals with symptomatic atrial fibrillation and as an alternative to antiarrhythmic medications. Taking a few minutes to relax each day and release stress could help lower your risk of cardiovascular disease. There are different types of meditation practices using techniques such as deep breathing, sustained focus on a phrase or sound or quiet contemplation to help create a stress-free, relaxed state of mind.
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PCSK9 Drugs Emerging as Strong Cholesterol-Lowering Agents

Since the cholesterol-lowering drugs PCSK9 inhibitors were first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) two years ago, there has been considerable curiosity about just how effective they can be, and whether they will be affordable for the averageconsumer.
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