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Womens Advisor

Why an Ob/Gyn Should Not Be Your Only Doctor

After a girl ages out of a pediatricians care, her next doctor is likely to be a gynecologist. Unless she has a chronic health condition or suffers a health scare, this may be the only doctor she sees for many years. But young women would be wise to establish a relationship with a general practitioner, who will examine them for cardiovascular risk factors and address these issues early.
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Other Diseases Can Increase the Risk of Heart Attack, Stroke

Having an autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, celiac disease, lupus or inflammatory bowel disease greatly increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The connection is systemic inflammation. Inflammatory cells settle in blood vessel walls, where they perpetuate inflammation and make plaque prone to rupture, causing a heart attack or stroke.
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Migraine with Aura and Stroke

Before birth, blood bypasses the lungs by circulation through a hole between the upper chambers of the heart called a foramen ovale. After birth, the hole generally closes. If it does not, it is known as a patent (open) foramen ovale, or PFO. PFOs increase the risk of a blood clot passing from the right side of the heart into the left side, where it gets pumped into the circulation and travels to the brain, causing a cardioembolic stroke.
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Exercise as Medicine for Women with Heart Failure

For more than a decade, weve known that the more physically active and fit you are, the lower your risk of developing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), the type of heart failure most common in women.
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Ask The Doctors: April 2018

Have you ever heard of this? I thought biotin was a vitamin! Last year I had a heart attack. They took me to the cath lab to locate the blockage and stent it, but found my arteries were clean. If I didnt have a blockage, did I really have a heart attack? I don't understand what happened to me.
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Download the Full WHA April 2018 Issue PDF

After a girl ages out of a pediatricians care, her next doctor is likely to be a gynecologist. Unless she has a chronic health condition or suffers a health scare, this may be the only doctor she sees for many years. But young women would be wise to establish a relationship with a general practitioner, who will examine them for cardiovascular risk factors and address these issues early.
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Subscribe to Heart Advisor

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Download the Full WHA October 2017 Issue PDF

Around the time of menopause, many women discover they no longer sleep like they used to. Hot flashes cause many to awaken multiple times per night and have difficultly going back to sleep. Some women need to get up several times a night to urinate, due to declining levels of the hormone that allows the body to retain water. Others just cant fall asleep at night, or find they awaken too early.
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How Well Do You Sleep? Your Heart Health Is at Stake

Around the time of menopause, many women discover they no longer sleep like they used to. Hot flashes cause many to awaken multiple times per night and have difficultly going back to sleep. Some women need to get up several times a night to urinate, due to declining levels of the hormone that allows the body to retain water. Others just cant fall asleep at night, or find they awaken too early.
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A Small Gland in Your Neck Can Have a Big Impact on Your Heart

Two hormones secreted by the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland in your neck-thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3)-run your life. These hormones tell your body to speed up or slow down. They regulate how fast you burn calories, and how tired you feel.
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A Floppy Mitral Valve May Not Be Serious

Mitral valve prolapse used to be considered a womans problem, but it affects men as well. Most people with mitral valve prolapse have no symptoms and are unaware they have it. Thats okay, because the condition is not serious, unless the valve develops a severe leak. If the valve doesnt leak, or only leaks a little bit, no treatment is needed. You can continue your normal activities, says A. Marc Gillinov, MD, Cleveland Clinics Chairman of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.
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Women’s Heart Advisor Ask The Doctors: October 2017

My cardiologist wants me to lose at least 40 pounds, with the hopes my diabetes and high blood pressure will resolve. Ive tried every diet there is, but I just cant keep weight off. Is it my imagination, or is it getting harder to lose even a couple of pounds? Whats your opinion about eating eggs?
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Women’s Heart Advisor Ask The Doctors: April 2017

Im a 37-year-old woman who reads Heart Advisor, because I subscribed for my mother and stepfather. I find it very educational, because I am interested in doing everything I can to lower my risk of heart disease after losing my father to a heart attack way too young. Recently I read a news clip that a first pregnancy resulting in a preterm birth increased the chances the mother would develop heart disease later in life. My first child, now age 6, was born at 35 weeks gestation. Does that put me at increased risk?
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