Medication

Heart Beat: July 2018

Results of a long-term study of male physicians found no association between the development of heart failure and cancer. Researchers analyzed more than 28,000 patients who were disease-free when they enrolled in one of three clinical trials. After a median of 19.9 years, 1,420 of the participants had developed heart failure, 7,363 had been diagnosed with cancer and 177 had developed both.
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Erectile Dysfunction Closely Tied to Heart Attack Risk

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one reason some men cant achieve an erection, says Cleveland Clinic cardiologist Michael Rocco, MD. In men ages 40 to 70 who have no symptoms of heart trouble, ED is an independent risk factor for a heart attack within about three to five years.
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Heart Beat: June 2018

Its both a tragedy and an irony when a powerful chemotherapy agent cures a woman of breast cancer, only to leave her with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. It is not uncommon. Some of the most effective chemotherapy drugs used in the fight against breast cancer are known to be toxic to the heart. These include the anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (Adriamycin), and the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). The risk is great enough to cause some oncologists to discontinue using these effective drugs.
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Taking a Different Approach to Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke

Since a stroke overstimulates the immune system, resulting in permanent damage to the brain, can using stem cells to calm the immune system limit the extent of damage caused by a stroke? Cleveland Clinic researchers participating in multicenter studies of this unusual approach to stem cell therapy are trying to find out. We are cautiously optimistic, says neurologist Ken Uchino, MD.
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Ask The Doctors: June 2018

Depending on your exercise goals, there may be specific benefits to working out at a particular time of day. Exercising in the morning may be associated with lower blood pressure, better sleep and greater weight loss, due to improved fat burning and appetite suppression. Studies also suggest that people tend to be more consistent with morning exercise, due to fewer distractions that are likely to interrupt their routines later in the day.
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Heart Failure Breakthrough

Cardiologists are calling angiotensin receptor/neprilysin inhibitors (ARNIs) one of the most exciting developments in heart failure in decades. These drugs relax blood vessels and eliminate excess fluid and sodium in a new, very effective way.
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Ask The Doctors: May 2018

In 2002, the American Heart Association recommended that patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) consume 1 gram daily of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids containing EPA plus DHA, preferably from oily fish. Supplements are okay if you dont like fish. In 2012, 8 percent of adults in the United States were taking fish oil supplements. However, fatty acids may have gained their heart-healthy reputation in the absence of strong evidence. Only one clinical trial reported benefit in patients with heart failure, and there is little evidence to support its benefit for primary prevention.
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Know When You Might Benefit from Palliative Care (Psst…Its Not Hospice)

In the course of a disease, you may experience distressing symptoms, despite the best medical treatment. Or you learn that a procedure that might save your life has frightening risks. You may run out of treatment options and worry about what will happen next.
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Heart Beat: May 2018

The bacterium Chlamydia pneumonia is known to be present in atherosclerotic plaques, and macrolide antibiotics will eradicate C. pneumoniae from atherosclerosis. Two studies have shown this improves the cardiovascular health of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), likely by reducing inflammation.
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Migraine with Aura and Stroke

Before birth, blood bypasses the lungs by circulation through a hole between the upper chambers of the heart called a foramen ovale. After birth, the hole generally closes. If it does not, it is known as a patent (open) foramen ovale, or PFO. PFOs increase the risk of a blood clot passing from the right side of the heart into the left side, where it gets pumped into the circulation and travels to the brain, causing a cardioembolic stroke.
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Theres No Need to Fear Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

Most physicians try treating a medical problem medically before recommending an invasive procedure or surgery. But in the case of the cardiac arrhythmia known as atrial fibrillation (AFib), a procedure called ablation is proving so successful that it is increasingly being recommended as a primary treatment for patients with certain forms of this condition.
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Download the Full February 2018 Issue PDF

Dont forget to cultivate good habits as a couple. A different study revealed a higher risk of diabetes in husbands whose wives gained weight. Since couples tend to eat the same meals and have the same eating habits, both people are likely to suffer or benefit from their choices, so choose well.
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