Cleveland Clinic’s 2015 Innovations Include Heart-Health Breakthroughs
Small experimental pacemakers without leads can be implanted in one of the ventricles of the heart (above) and help patients with arrhythmias maintain a steady rhythm.

Cleveland Clinic’s 2015 Innovations Include Heart-Health Breakthroughs

A tiny implantable pacemaker, new medications, and a mobile stroke unit are among the items on the annual list of medical advancements.

The typical pacemaker is about the size of a silver dollar, with a thin, flexible wire, or lead, that runs to the heart. But a new pacemaker is being studied that is not only much smaller than the current devices, but it works without wires. The leadless pacemaker is one of the 10 items on Cleveland Clinic’s Medical Innovations for 2015.

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