The Role of 4 Vitamins in PeripheralVascular Disease

The Role of 4 Vitamins in PeripheralVascular Disease

Do you wonder if taking vitamin B, C, D or E will lower your cardiovascular risk?

Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have atherosclerosis in the smaller vessels of their body, usually in their legs, feet and arms. PAD increases the risk of losing a limb to amputation. It also increases the risk of having coronary artery disease (CAD) or cerebrovascular disease. PAD patients have a higher risk of dying from a heart attack or stroke than CAD patients who don't have PAD.

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  • 6 Shoes

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    How to Find the Best Walking Shoes

    You'll reap the most benefits from walking if you wear the right shoes.

    The midsole is the part of a shoe sandwiched between the outsole, which touches the ground, and the insole, which is located on the inside of the shoe underneath the liner. Oftentimes, the midsole of a walking shoe is thin and pliable and is made from ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA),...

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  • 7 Walkers

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Walking for Exercise

    You've done it for decades, but this is the right way to do it!

    "Walking is a great aerobic exercise, so long as you do it often enough and long enough to gain cardiovascular benefit," says Cleveland Clinic cardiologist Michael Rocco, MD, who coached thousands of patients in his career as medical director of Cardiac Rehabilitation at Cleveland...

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  • 8 AorticRepair

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    What You Need to Know About Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    Experts describe how this dangerous aneurysm is best managed.

    When patients are involved in competitive sports, activity restrictions should be tailored to the risk of dissection or rupture. "We may recommend exercise stress testing to assess a patient's heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise," says Dr. Roselli. "We are developing...

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  • 9 Carbs

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Lower Your Triglycerides Naturally

    Careful food choices can usually bring down high triglyceride levels.

    Like cholesterol, triglycerides come from the food we eat and from our liver. Normal triglyceride levels serve a useful function: We use them for energy. But problems begin when we make more triglycerides than we use and store the remainder as fat. It stands to reason that people...

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  • 10 DentistVisit

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Infection from Gum Disease and Tooth Decay Can Make You Sick

    Poor oral health is linked to heart disease and its risk factors.

    In 2018, it was discovered that patients taking hypertension medications were unable to achieve blood pressure control when they had poor oral health. Overall, systolic blood pressure climbed as oral health declined. A little neglect had a large impact: Those with inflamed gums-the...

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  • 2 Sleep

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Heart Beat: April 2019

    Our biological clock (circadian system) governs many physiological processes, including blood pressure. Blood pressure normally dips at night. People who do not experience this temporary drop (called "non-dippers") are at increased risk for developing heart disease. Researchers...

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  • 11 DrPicApril19

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Ask The Doctors: April 2019

    A: It is normal for heart rate (HR) to increase during activity in order to provide nutrients and oxygen to exercising muscles. The formula for obtaining your maximum predicted HR-220 minus your age-tends to underestimate maximal HR by as much as 10 to 20 beats, particularly at...

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  • HA_April_2019_Cover_Image

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Download The Full April 2019 Issue PDF

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have atherosclerosis in the smaller vessels of their body, usually in their legs, feet and arms. PAD increases the risk of losing a limb to amputation. It also increases the risk of having coronary artery disease (CAD) or...

    Continue Reading