6 Natural Ways to Lower Blood Pressure
Reducing the amount of salt you consume is one of the best ways to lower blood pressure, but not the only one. There are five other proven methods and several that look promising but require more research.

6 Natural Ways to Lower Blood Pressure

You may not need medications to bring your blood pressure down. Even if you do, these proven non-pharmacologic methods will make them more effective.

The average American consumes 3,500 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day-far more than the American Heart Association recommendation of no more than 1,500 mg, or about one teaspoon, of salt. Because this amount is so strict, Cleveland Clinic sets the limit at 2,300 mg. "The difference in effect is only a drop of 2 to 3 mmHg," says Dr. Laffin. "At minimum, we recommend lowering sodium intake by at least 1,000 mg per day."

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    The average American consumes 3,500 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day-far more than the American Heart Association recommendation of no more than 1,500 mg, or about one teaspoon, of salt. Because this amount is so strict, Cleveland Clinic sets the limit at 2,300 mg. "The difference...

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