Should Stable Angina Be Treated With Stenting or Medications?
Samir Kapadia, MD, Head of Invasive and Interventional Cardiology, Cleveland Clinic

Should Stable Angina Be Treated With Stenting or Medications?

One of the most controversial clinical trials of 2017 has doctors debating this question. Here, a leading cardiologist explains when stenting may be the better choice, and why.

If you have stable angina—meaning your chest pain occurs predictably with physical exertion and disappears with rest—your doctor may recommend a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, or balloon angioplasty and stenting) to relieve your symptoms.

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    If you have stable angina—meaning your chest pain occurs predictably with physical exertion and disappears with rest—your doctor may recommend a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, or balloon angioplasty and stenting) to relieve your symptoms.

    Continue Reading