Combination Therapy May Be Best for Intermediate Heart Disease Risks

Combination Therapy May Be Best for Intermediate Heart Disease Risks

Research shows that adding a cholesterol-lowering drug may have a significant effect on individuals who have high blood pressure but are not yet considered high-risk patients.

We don’t tend to think of statins as antihypertensive medications, because they are designed to lower LDL cholesterol, not blood pressure. But recent research suggests that for many patients with high blood pressure, adding statins to their anti-hypertensive medication regimen may make a huge difference. In the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation-3 (HOPE-3) trial, researchers explored various combinations of anti-hypertensive and cholesterol-lowering drugs among individuals considered to be at intermediate risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

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Featured Articles

  • Hypertensive Urgency Doesn’t Always Require Hospitalization

    High Blood Pressure

    Hypertensive Urgency Doesn’t Always Require Hospitalization

    A Cleveland Clinic study finds that patients whose blood pressure spikes sharply may be treated safely and effectively with outpatient therapy.

    The rate of major adverse cardiovascular events, such as stroke or heart attack, is relatively low among patients who experience hypertensive urgency. Because of that, these patients can be safely treated with outpatient care instead of being hospitalized, according to a Cleveland...

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  • Tracking Blood Pressure Over Time May Reveal Future Events

    High Blood Pressure

    Tracking Blood Pressure Over Time May Reveal Future Events

    Your pattern of blood pressure readings over a period of years may be a better predictor of cardiovascular events than a single high reading.

    Your pattern of systolic blood pressure from middle age onward may provide a more accurate snapshot of your risk of stroke and other hypertension-related complications than a single high blood pressure reading. That’s according to a study published recently in the American...

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  • Wearable Defibrillators Helpful for Patients Not Suited for ICDs

    Valves and Vessels

    Wearable Defibrillators Helpful for Patients Not Suited for ICDs

    The American Heart Association issues an advisory for the use of these life-saving devices, highlighting their effectiveness as short-term solutions.

    A wearable automatic defibrillator may be a very helpful alternative to implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for a select group of patients with abnormal heart rhythms, according to the American Heart Association’s (AHA) first-ever advisory on wearable defibrillators....

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  • New Cellular Device Improves Data Collection from Pacemakers, ICDs

    Heart Failure

    New Cellular Device Improves Data Collection from Pacemakers, ICDs

    The CardioMessenger Smart helps reduce dependency on landlines to relay information from implanted cardiac devices to medical providers.

    If you have a pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), or similar cardiac device in your chest, it’s important that your doctor keep tabs on how the technology is functioning. Is the ICD administering life-saving shocks at the right time? Is the pacemaker...

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  • Reducing Surgeries Key to Healthy Long-term ICD Use

    Valves and Vessels

    Reducing Surgeries Key to Healthy Long-term ICD Use

    Patients who have an implantable cardioverter defibrillator for decades can reduce their infection risk if they also reduce device-related surgeries.

    Improvements in technology and greater patient adherence to heart-healthy lifestyles are allowing individuals with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) to live longer with their cardiac devices. ICDs are implanted in the chest and have thin wires (called leads) that...

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  • New Nutrition Labels Help You Make Healthier Food Choices

    Diet, Exercise and Supplements

    New Nutrition Labels Help You Make Healthier Food Choices

    The new labels required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration highlight calorie content and the amount of added sugars in packaged goods.

    Some of the most important information on food nutrition labels will be a little easier to find once companies start complying with new labeling rules approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The new labels won’t look all that different from the ones you’re used...

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  • Combination Therapy May Be Best for Intermediate Heart Disease Risks

    Risks and Symptoms

    Combination Therapy May Be Best for Intermediate Heart Disease Risks

    Research shows that adding a cholesterol-lowering drug may have a significant effect on individuals who have high blood pressure but are not yet considered high-risk patients.

    We don’t tend to think of statins as antihypertensive medications, because they are designed to lower LDL cholesterol, not blood pressure. But recent research suggests that for many patients with high blood pressure, adding statins to their anti-hypertensive medication regimen...

    Continue Reading

  • Download the Full August Issue PDF

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Download the Full August Issue PDF

    One of the other differences you’ll notice is in the listing of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Calcium and iron will still be listed, but they will be joined by potassium and vitamin D. Vitamins A and C will no longer be required, but may be added voluntarily by the...

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