Why You Should Learn CPR
To gain confidence in your ability to perform CPR, check with your local YMCA, fire station, high school or American Heart Association office for classes open to the public.

Why You Should Learn CPR

More than 350,000 times a year in homes and public places throughout the U.S., someone’s heart starts beating so fast and erratically that it is unable to pump blood effectively. In a split second, the person collapses and lies motionless on the ground without a pulse.

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Featured Articles

  • american heartaassociation

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Definition of High Blood Pressure Is Lowered by 10 Points

    Guidelines were changed to prevent more cardiovascular events and deaths.

    But when a review of more than 900 clinical trials found that a reading of 130/80 mmHg offered far greater protection against stroke, cardiovascular death and all-cause death, the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology issued new guidelines lowering their...

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  • icu

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    The Cardiology Intensive Care Unit: Where Lives Are Saved

    Families often become extremely fearful when a heart patient is transferred to an intensive care unit (ICU). The number of strange tubes, monitors and machines can be frightening, and the continual presence of nurses can be worrisome. But when a heart patient becomes very sick, the...

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  • stem cell therapy

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Taking a Different Approach to Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke

    Researchers hope dampening the immune response will limit damage.

    Since a stroke overstimulates the immune system, resulting in permanent damage to the brain, can using stem cells to calm the immune system limit the extent of damage caused by a stroke? Cleveland Clinic researchers participating in multicenter studies of this unusual approach to...

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  • aorticaneurysm

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Patients with Aortic Disease Require Lifelong Care

    Surgery can avert catastrophic death, but the disease process marches on.

    Aortic disease kills more than 40,000 people a year in the U.S. alone, yet is relatively unknown. The disease causes the walls of the aorta, the largest blood vessel in the body, to weaken and balloon out, creating an aortic aneurysm. When the aneurysm reaches its limit, the inner...

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  • Michael Rocco, MD

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Ask The Doctors: June 2018

    Depending on your exercise goals, there may be specific benefits to working out at a particular time of day. Exercising in the morning may be associated with lower blood pressure, better sleep and greater weight loss, due to improved fat burning and appetite suppression. Studies...

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  • heart beat

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Heart Beat: June 2018

    It’s both a tragedy and an irony when a powerful chemotherapy agent cures a woman of breast cancer, only to leave her with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. It is not uncommon. Some of the most effective chemotherapy drugs used in the fight against breast cancer are known to be...

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  • heart advisor magazine

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Download the Full June 2018 Issue PDF

    “CPR is a simple intervention that anyone can master with little training, yet the magnitude of its effect is incomparable,” says Venu Menon, MD, Director of the Coronary Care Unit at Cleveland Clinic. Many people who suffer sudden cardiac death are in the prime of life...

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