A Healthy Lifestyle Helps Control LDL Cholesterol

A Healthy Lifestyle Helps Control LDL Cholesterol

Regular exercise and consistent weight management could translate into lower doses of statins and other medications for heart health.

But since you can’t change your family medical history or your age—adding up the years often means watching your LDL go up, too—you should learn the steps that can help bring your cholesterol under control. Since high LDL is a major risk factor for heart disease, it’s worth exploring your options.

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Featured Articles

  • muscle pains from statins

    High Cholesterol

    Study Helps Affirm Evidence of Statins’ Muscle-related Side Effects

    Cleveland Clinic researchers explore statin intolerance, making a strong argument on behalf of patients who complained of muscle pain caused by the cholesterol drugs.

    Statins are among the most widely prescribed medications in the U.S. They are generally well tolerated, but some people complain that the cholesterol-lowering drugs cause them muscle pain. Many of these individuals say the pain dissipates soon after stopping statin therapy.

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  • Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Diabetes, Supplements, Psoriasis and Depression

    Controlling your blood pressure, LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and blood glucose levels are proven means of lowering your risk of cardiovascular disease. A British study of more than 500,000 men and women found that calcium and vitamin D supplementation is not not associated...

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  • Study: Rate, Rhythm Control Both Effective in Treating Post-op Afib

    Arrythmia

    Study: Rate, Rhythm Control Both Effective in Treating Post-op Afib

    Atrial fibrillation is a common result of heart surgery, but a Cleveland Clinic study finds that rate, rhythm control are equally safe and beneficial.

    An all-too-common consequence of heart surgery is atrial fibrillation (afib), an abnormal heart rhythm marked by the chaotic beating of the heart’s upper chambers (atria). Instead of beating in a strong, synchronous rhythm with the lower chambers (ventricles), the atria quiver...

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  • Rhythm Control May Be Best for Afib in Heart Failure Patients

    Heart Failure

    Rhythm Control May Be Best for Afib in Heart Failure Patients

    Individuals with heart failure and atrial fibrillation may have reduced exercise capacity with rate control, suggesting rhythm control is better.

    Atrial fibrillation (afib) and heart failure both reduce the heart’s ability to pump enough blood to match the body’s needs. The decision whether to treat patients with both conditions with heart rate control or heart rhythm control can have profound effects on their...

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  • Heart Benefits From Losing Just Five Percent of Your Body Weight

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Heart Benefits From Losing Just Five Percent of Your Body Weight

    Setting a reasonable weight-loss goal is helpful in the short term, but if you need to lose a lot of weight, set long-term goals, too.

    Patton suggests a weight-loss target of a half-pound to one pound per week for women, and one to two pounds per week for men. These goals may vary depending on your starting weight and whether you plan to lose weight with diet alone or with a combination of diet and exercise.

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  • Valves and Vessels

    Study Shows Heart Attack Patients Are Younger, Sicker

    A Cleveland Clinic analysis of patient data finds that more heart attack victims have preventable risk factors, such as obesity, smoking, and hypertension.

    In a review of nearly 4,000 heart attack patient histories, Samir Kapadia, MD, section head of Invasive and Interventional Cardiology at Cleveland Clinic, and his team found that rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are much higher now among people who suffer heart attacks.

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  • Research Shows Bariatric Surgery Provides Long-Term Benefits

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Research Shows Bariatric Surgery Provides Long-Term Benefits

    The weight-loss surgery may help reduce diabetes symptoms for at least five years, according to the latest results from an ongoing study.

    Bariatric surgery may have lasting benefits for obese individuals trying to control their blood glucose levels. Cleveland Clinic’s STAMPEDE trial found that the weight-loss surgery’s positive effects may last at least five years or more for mild and moderately obese...

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  • A Healthy Lifestyle Helps Control LDL Cholesterol

    High Cholesterol

    A Healthy Lifestyle Helps Control LDL Cholesterol

    Regular exercise and consistent weight management could translate into lower doses of statins and other medications for heart health.

    But since you can’t change your family medical history or your age—adding up the years often means watching your LDL go up, too—you should learn the steps that can help bring your cholesterol under control. Since high LDL is a major risk factor for heart disease,...

    Continue Reading

  • High Cholesterol

    New Drug Improves Cholesterol, but Doesn’t Lower Heart Risks

    A Cleveland Clinc study finds that evacetrapib lowers LDL and raises HDL, yet heart attack and stroke rates are unchanged among patients on the drug.

    Despite its ability to reduce LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and significantly increase levels of HDL (“good”) cholesterol, the experimental medication evacetrapib failed to reduce rates of major cardiovascular events, such as heart attack and stroke.

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  • Ask the Doctors: June 2016

    Heart Failure

    Ask the Doctors: June 2016

    It is important to recognize a few things about these drugs. They have been shown to consistently lower LDL cholesterol by over 50 percent with good tolerance. However, studies to examine long-term safety and ability to reduce adverse heart and vascular events are still ongoing....

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  • Download the Full June 2016 Issue PDF

    Your Heart and Other Conditions

    Download the Full June 2016 Issue PDF

    Restoring normal rhythm led to improved exercise capacity, Dr. Elshazly says. “This (study) provides mechanistic evidence that a rhythmcontrol strategy may potentially improve peak exercise capacity and survival, a finding that requires future prospective appraisal in this...

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