February 2018

Ask The Doctors: February 2018

I have borderline elevated blood pressure and was told there are new recommendations for blood pressure treatment. What are they? I am an active 76-year-old man. Last year, my doctor told me that it was okay for my systolic blood pressure to be in the 150s. Is this best for me?   More...

What Your Doctor Sees In an ECG

Subscribers Only — In a world of increasingly sophisticated tests for heart disease, one golden oldie continues to stand out: electrocardiography. This method of recording the heart’s electrical activity was developed in the early 20th century and remains the first test doctors reach for when a patient exhibits the signs or symptoms of heart disease.   More...

Overweight? Here’s Why Those Extra Pounds Are Hard on Your Heart

This may be why heart disease remains the world’s leading killer. Multiple studies have confirmed the connection between obesity and death in men and women alike. “As your body-mass index (BMI, a measurement of obesity) goes up, your risk of dying increases,” says Cleveland Clinic preventive cardiologist Haitham Ahmed, MD, MPH.   More...

Metabolic Syndrome Is a Call to Action You Should Take Seriously

Subscribers Only — Maybe your belt has gotten tighter, or your pants are snug around the waist. Then you learn your blood pressure is up, your blood sugar level has risen or your blood lipid levels are out of whack. Should you be worried? Absolutely, says Cleveland Clinic endocrinologist Betul Hatipoglu, MD. This cluster of findings is called metabolic syndrome, and if left unchecked, leads to trouble.   More...

Heart Beat: February 2018

As a growing number of states legalize marijuana, studies are finding that pot smoking might have a fatal impact on the cardiovascular system. A study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology on Aug. 9, 2017, found marijuana users had a significantly greater risk of death from hypertension than non-users.   More...

Can Marriage Affect Your Heart Risk?

As anyone who is married or partnered will tell you, relationships have their ups and downs. Now, a British study has found that these changes may impact a man’s cardiovascular disease risk over time.   More...