August 2017

Ask The Doctors: August 2017

I have had stable angina for about three years. I know how much exercise I can do before I feel any chest pain. My numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, etc.) are pretty well controlled. Is there any way to predict if I’ll eventually develop unstable angina, and can I do anything to help prevent that?   More...

What Is Cardiovascular Disease? It’s Actually Dozens of Disorders

You may hear the term “cardiovascular disease” used interchangeably with “heart disease” or any of several other terms to describe problems with your heart or blood vessels. But what is cardiovascular disease (CVD) exactly, and why does it seem to be applied so broadly to conditions related to circulation?   More...

Aggressive Blood Pressure Lowering Has Its Risks

Subscribers Only — Current blood pressure management guidelines recommend maintaining a blood pressure of less than 120/80 mm Hg. Guidelines further state that treatment is appropriate for most people if their blood pressure reaches 140/90 mm Hg or higher.   More...

What You Should Know About a Diet for Diabetes

Subscribers Only — A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes demands a number of changes to everyday life. In addition to medications and more exercise, one of the biggest adjustments you have to make is to your daily diet. But a diet for diabetes isn’t simply one that includes fewer carbohydrates (though that is crucial). You’ll need to look at how you time your meals, how much protein and fiber you’re consuming, and get to know the foods you should be eating and those you should avoid.   More...

Heat Beat: August 2017

Taking a daily aspirin to protect against a stroke or heart attack poses a higher risk of disabling or fatal bleeding in people over the age of 75, according to a study published recently in The Lancet. Researchers noted, however, that the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding can often be minimized if older adults on aspirin therapy also take a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI).   More...

Heart Disease Is More Than “Clogged Pipes”—It’s a Disease of Inflammation

It’s easy to think of heart disease as a “plumbing problem.” Arteries, like household pipes, can become clogged. And like a clogged pipe that won’t let much water through, a blocked artery can reduce blood flow. This leads to angina, the chest pain that results from a decrease in oxygenated blood reaching the heart muscle. Completely blocked arteries also can lead to heart attacks.   More...