October 2017

Download the Full WHA October 2017 Issue PDF

Subscribers Only — Around the time of menopause, many women discover they no longer sleep like they used to. Hot flashes cause many to awaken multiple times per night and have difficultly going back to sleep. Some women need to get up several times a night to urinate, due to declining levels of the hormone that allows the body to retain water. Others just canít fall asleep at night, or find they awaken too early.   More...

Women's Heart Advisor Ask The Doctors: October 2017

My cardiologist wants me to lose at least 40 pounds, with the hopes my diabetes and high blood pressure will resolve. Iíve tried every diet there is, but I just canít keep weight off. Is it my imagination, or is it getting harder to lose even a couple of pounds? Whatís your opinion about eating eggs?   More...

A Floppy Mitral Valve May Not Be Serious

Mitral valve prolapse used to be considered a womanís problem, but it affects men as well. Most people with mitral valve prolapse have no symptoms and are unaware they have it. Thatís okay, because the condition is not serious, unless the valve develops a severe leak. ďIf the valve doesnít leak, or only leaks a little bit, no treatment is needed. You can continue your normal activities,Ē says A. Marc Gillinov, MD, Cleveland Clinicís Chairman of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.   More...

How Well Do You Sleep? Your Heart Health Is at Stake

Subscribers Only — Around the time of menopause, many women discover they no longer sleep like they used to. Hot flashes cause many to awaken multiple times per night and have difficultly going back to sleep. Some women need to get up several times a night to urinate, due to declining levels of the hormone that allows the body to retain water. Others just canít fall asleep at night, or find they awaken too early.   More...

Ask the Doctors: October 2017

What is metabolic syndrome, and what are the implications of having it? How can it be prevented or treated? I tried CPAP for my obstructive sleep apnea more than a year ago, but I couldnít get used to the mask and the noise. Is the equipment getting better? Are there any effective CPAP alternatives?   More...

Chocolate and Atrial Fibrillation: Protective or Wishful Thinking?

Subscribers Only — Chocolate, particularly dark chocolate, often gets tabbed as a heart-healthy treat. The idea is that the flavanols in chocolate have disease-fighting antioxidant power that preserves the health of your blood vessels, and may have other properties that improve blood pressure and help prevent blood clots. Flavanols are a type of flavanoid, a substance also found in fruits and vegetables that helps protect plants from toxins and environmental damage.   More...

Find Tasty, Healthier Alternatives to High-Sodium Foods

Cutting sodium from your diet requires more than skipping the salt shaker at dinner time and avoiding fast food. Plenty of everyday foods are also packed with blood pressure-raising sodium. But by reading labels and adjusting your eating style, you may be surprised how much sodium you eliminate from your diet, says Julia Zumpano, RD, LD, with Preventive Cardiology at Cleveland Clinic.   More...

Study: Diabetes Not a Reason to Avoid Cardiac Bypass Surgery

As the number of people with diabetes continues to grow, the other health ramifications of this disease are still being discovered. A common complication of diabetes is damage to your blood vessels. High levels of glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream can contribute to atherosclerosis, a hardening and narrowing of the arteries.   More...

For Severe Coronary Artery Disease, Bypass May Be Best

The decision to treat blocked arteries in the heart with angioplasty and stenting or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) usually depends on several factors. The location and severity of the blockage are among the main considerations. A recent Cleveland Clinic study suggests that in at least two situations, CABG is the better choice.   More...

Learn Relaxation Techniques to Lower Blood Pressure

Subscribers Only — You take your blood pressure medications, exercise daily, and follow a heart-healthy diet. But you still struggle to get a handle on your hypertension. Or maybe youíre taking several pills to get your blood pressure into a healthy range, and youíd like to reduce the number of medications you take every day. Relax. Just relax. It isnít that those concerns arenít valid. Itís that you may just want to mix in some relaxation techniques to lower blood pressure. Stress is an unseen threat to your health, but it shouldnít be overlooked.   More...

Heart Beat: October 2017

Sizable fluctuations in home blood pressure readings were tied to a greater risk of Alzheimerís disease, independent of high systolic blood pressure, according to a study published in the journal Circulation. Quitting statins three to six months after an initial ischemic stroke significantly raises your risk of having a second stroke within a year. A recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that cancer patients face an increased risk of an arterial thromboembolism within the first six months after their diagnosis.   More...

Afib Causes Include Controllable Risk Factors and Structural Heart Problems

Atrial fibrillation (afib) affects an estimated 2.7 million Americans, and is a leading risk factor for stroke and other cardiovascular problems. When a heart is in afib, the upper chambers (atria) beat chaotically and out of synch with the lower chambers (ventricles). This can cause blood to pool in the heart and form a blood clot. It can also put extra strain on the heart, putting you at a higher risk of heart failure.   More...